DNC Files Lawsuit Against Russia, WikiLeaks, and the Donald Trump Campaign

Ken AshfordL'Affaire Russe, Trump & AdministrationLeave a Comment

It looks like Democrats, like the Republicans in Congress, want to take a look at what Mueller has.  The Democratic National Committee is ready to take things to court.

The complaint, filed in federal district court in Manhattan, alleges that top Trump campaign officials conspired with the Russian government and its military spy agency to hurt Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and help Trump by hacking the computer networks of the Democratic Party and disseminating stolen material found there.

The Democratic Party asserts that it has standing to bring this lawsuit because the actions of Trump, WikiLeaks, and Russia resulted in a conspiracy that not only did damage to the electoral process of the country, but to the party, whose stolen information was obtained by Russia, distributed by WikiLeaks, and used by the Trump campaign.

The lawsuit argues that Russia is not entitled to sovereign immunity in this case because “the DNC claims arise out of Russia’s trespass on to the DNC’s private servers…in order to steal trade secrets and commit economic espionage.”

Here is the complaint:

The Democratic Party is plantiff in the suit, with complaints against a list that includes the Russia government, the Russian hackers, Julian Assange, Donald Trump Jr, Paul Manafort, Jared Kushner, and Roger Stone.

In 2016, individuals tied to the Kremlin notified the Trump campaign that Russia intended to interfere with our democracy. Through multiple meetings, emails, and other communications, these Russian agents made clear that their government supported Trump and was prepared to use stolen emails and other information to damage his opponent and the Democratic Party.

If the lawsuit seems like an unusual approach, it’s not.  There’s actually precedent.

The lawsuit echoes a similar legal tactic that the Democratic Party used during the Watergate scandal. In 1972, the DNC filed suit against then President Richard Nixon’s reelection committee seeking $1 million in damages for the break-in at Democratic headquarters in the Watergate building.

That suit was successful. And it’s successful conclusion coincided with Nixon leaving office.

Sometimes, you have to hope that history really does repeat itself.