I Love Stats Like These

They’re rich and chock full of meaning. This I lifted from Eric Alterman’s site. This is, in fact, part of the new afterward to the paperback edition of his book "What Liberal Media?", and it is sssoo-wwweeet:

An in-depth study undertaken for the University of Maryland’s Program on International Policy Attitudes and published around the time of the second anniversary of the attacks found that over sixty percent of Americans believed one of the following misperceptions:

* There’s clear evidence that Iraqi President Saddam Hussein worked closely with the Sept. 11 terrorists.

* U.S. forces found weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.

* People in foreign countries generally either backed the U.S.-led war or were evenly split between supporting and opposing it.

Moreover, the researchers discovered a direct correlation between these misperceptions and the consumption of television news as opposed to newspapers or National Public Radio. According to its figures, 80 percent of Fox News’ audience and 71 percent of CBS’s bought into at least one of the above falsehoods.

Meanwhile only 47 percent of newspaper and magazine readers and just 23 percent of those who said they relied on PBS or NPR found themselves similarly misled.

And lest we forget, phony ideas have consequences. Support for Bush’s war reached 53 percent among those who believed one of the lies, 78 percent among those who accepted two of them and a full 86 percent among those who embraced all three.

Meanwhile fewer than a quarter of people who understood the truth of the situation–rejecting all three phony canards—were willing to take a trip on Bush and Cheney’s not-so excellent adventure.

(Emphasis mine) So, where do YOU fall in this little statistical paradigm?

What do you think?